$8.25 Man and A $8.75 Million CEO Same Company


Comment:  Right To Work What the differences From a Union
12-13-2012

People talk about Poor wages, they complain about no health insurance,70663-Royalty-Free-RF-Clipart-Illustration-Of-A-Lazy-Boss-Smoking-A-Cigar-And-Relaxing-With-His-Feet-On-His-Desk but yet CEO’s say they can’t afford to give their Employees a Pay raise and Insurance, BUT YET they can give them selves pay raises and Health insurance along with the Board of Directors and top Executives Top Dollar and yearly raises, and the Government does nothing about it like they did back in the Sixties where they set Workers pay at Three Percent a year, that is about when the spread between WORKERS and CEO’s started and Insurance started to disappear.

Conflict Of Office

Conflict Of Office

Now how about the Unions Pay packages and Insurance (not the Members, but the Unions), and what have they done to help get equal pay as all CEO,s nothing, but they sure hobnob with them, play golf, go to lunch with them, you can go on and on, just like Boeing s, can not give pay raises but they sure give them selves one, and this is the same as all Companies, AND WHAT have some Unions done for you other than take away your pay raise to pay your increase in DUES.

I am not against some Unions because I am a Union member and treated good, but I have been in other Unions and got nothing but pay dews and watch them drive around in fancy cars and go to high-end restaurants to eat, and see them run around in Five Hundred Dollar Suits or more, now is that protecting you the worker.

What is Obama doing about this, taking his $8.25 an hour job and giving it to some one else (spreading the wealth).

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McDonald’s $8.25 Man and $8.75 Million CEO Shows Pay Gap

Bloomberg
By Leslie Patton | Bloomberg
Wed, Dec 12, 2012

Tyree Johnson scrubs himself with a bar of soap in a McDonald’s (MCD) bathroom and puts on fresh deodorant. He stashes his toiletries in a Kenneth Cole bag, a gift from his mother who works the counter at Macy’s, and hops on an El train. His destination: another McDonald’s.

Johnson isn’t one of Chicago’s many homeless people who seek shelter in fast-food joints. He’s a McDonald’s employee, at both stores — one in the Loop, the other about a mile away in the shadow of Holy Name Cathedral.

He needs the makeshift baths because hygiene and appearance are part of his annual compensation reviews. Even with frequent scrubbings, he said before a recent shift, it’s hard to remove the essence of the greasy food he works around.

“I hate when my boss tells me she won’t give me a raise because she can smell me,” he said.

Johnson, 44, needs the two paychecks to pay rent for his apartment at a single-room occupancy hotel on the city’s north side. While he’s worked at McDonald’s stores for two decades, he still doesn’t get 40 hours a week and makes $8.25 an hour, minimum wage in Illinois.

This is life in one of America’s premier growth industries. Fast-food restaurants have added positions more than twice as fast as the U.S. average during the recovery that began in June 2009. The jobs created by companies including Burger King Worldwide Inc. and Yum! Brands Inc. (YUM), which owns the Pizza Hut, Taco Bell and KFC brands, are among the lowest-paid in the U.S. — except in the C suite.


Pay Disparity

The pay gap separating fast-food workers from their chief executive officers is growing at each of those companies. The disparity has doubled at McDonald’s Corp. in the last 10 years, according to data compiled by Bloomberg. At the same time, the company helped pay for lobbying against minimum-wage increases and sought to quash the kind of unionization efforts that erupted recently on the streets of Chicago and New York.

Older workers like Johnson are staffing fast-food grills and fryers more often, according to data from the U.S. Census Bureau’s Current Population Survey. In 2010, 16- to 19-year-olds made up 17 percent of food preparation and serving workers, down from almost a quarter in 2000, as older, underemployed Americans took those jobs.

“The sheer number of adults in the industry has just exploded” because fast-food restaurants “not only survived, but thrived during the economic recession,” said Saru Jayaraman, director of the Food Labor Research Center at the University of California at Berkeley.


Million Hours

Jim Skinner, President and CEO of McDonald’s (Denis Sinyakoov/Reuters/Corbis)Johnson would need about a million hours of work — or more than a century on the clock — to earn the $8.75 million that McDonald’s, based in the Chicago suburb of Oak Brook, paid then- CEO Jim Skinner last year. Johnson’s work flipping burgers and hoisting boxes of french fries, like millions of other jobs in low-wage industries, helps explain why income inequality grew after the 2007-2009 recession ended.

The recovery from the last downturn has been the most uneven in recent history. The 1.2 million households whose incomes put them in the top 1 percent of the U.S. saw their earnings increase 5.5 percent last year, according to census estimates. Earnings fell 1.7 percent for the 97 million households in the bottom 80 percent — those who made less than $101,583.

The widening chasm is most pronounced in the restaurant and retail businesses. The total number of people employed in the U.S. at Wal-Mart Stores Inc. and McDonald’s and Yum Brands restaurants exceeds the entire 2.7 million population of Chicago. Net income at those three companies has jumped by at least 22 percent from four years ago.


Shareholders Benefit

Shareholders, not employees, have reaped the rewards. McDonald’s, for example, spent $6 billion on share repurchases and dividends last year, the equivalent of $14,286 per restaurant worker employed by the company. At the same time, restaurant companies have formed an industrywide effort to freeze the minimum wage, whose purchasing power is 20 percent less than in 1968, according to the Economic Policy Institute, a think tank that advocates for low- and middle-income workers.

Johnson begins most days the same way: picking cigarette butts out of the shower drain of a shared bathroom, using a tissue so he doesn’t touch them. While there’s a “No Smoking” sign posted inside the hotel where he lives, that doesn’t stop the other occupants who share the showers, sinks and toilets.

His rent at the hotel in Chicago’s Uptown neighborhood is $320 a month. Johnson usually can’t cover it all at once, so he’s allowed to pay $160 every two weeks, or even $80 a week, for his first-floor room. He’s late on November rent and owes about $100 — some of it a late-payment fee, he said. Since falling behind, he’s put off buying a Dell laptop for $99 that he found online.


‘Forget Computer’

“Forget about that computer,” Johnson said. For now, he’ll keep going to a local Apple store when he wants to update his Facebook page in his efforts to find someone nice to date and to stay in touch with his father.

A pay stub of Johnson’s shows that he earned $8,518.80 through Sept. 9 this year at the store that gives him most of his hours. He was able to work only 52 hours during that two- week pay period because the restaurant was being remodeled, he said. A statement of earnings from his other McDonald’s job shows that he worked fewer than 12 hours over two weeks, earning $95.45 before taxes.

Even with the U.S unemployment rate dropping last month to 7.7 percent, minimum-wage earners have less power to demand higher pay because so many adults are willing to take low-wage positions, said Nelson Lichtenstein, director of the Center for the Study of Work, Labor and Democracy at the University of California at Santa Barbara.

 

Pagination

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